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groff_font




DESCRIPTION

       The groff font format is roughly a superset of the ditroff
       font  format.  Unlike the ditroff font format, there is no
       associated binary format.  The font files for device  name
       are stored in a directory devname.  There are two types of
       file: a device description file called DESC and  for  each
       font  F a font file called F.  These are text files; there
       is no associated binary format.

   DESC file format
       The DESC file can contain the following types of line:

       res n  There are n machine units per inch.

       hor n  The horizontal resolution is n machine units.

       vert n The vertical resolution is n machine units.

       sizescale n
              The scale factor for pointsizes.  By  default  this
              has a value of 1.  One scaled point is equal to one
              point/n.  The arguments to the unitwidth and  sizes
              commands are given in scaled points.

       unitwidth n
              Quantities  in  the font files are given in machine
              units for  fonts  whose  point  size  is  n  scaled
              points.

       prepro program
              Call program as a preprocessor.

       postpro program
              Use program as the postprocessor.

       tcommand
              This  means that the postprocessor can handle the t
              and u output commands.

       sizes s1 s2...sn 0
              This  means  that  the  device  has  fonts  at  s1,
              s2,...sn  scaled points.  The list of sizes must be
              terminated by a 0.  Each si can also be a range  of
              sizes  m-n.  The list can extend over more than one
              line.

       styles S1 S2...Sm
              The first m font positions will be associated  with
              styles S1...Sm.

       fonts n F1 F2 F3...Fn
              requests that troff tells  the  driver  the  source
              file  name  being  processed.   This is achieved by
              another tcommand: F filename.

       charset
              This line and everything following in the file  are
              ignored.   It  is allowed for the sake of backwards
              compatibility.

       print program
              Use program as the spooler  program  for  printing.
              If  omitted,  the  -l  and  -L options of groff are
              ignored.

       The res, unitwidth, fonts and sizes lines are  compulsory.
       Other  commands  are  ignored  by troff but may be used by
       postprocessors to store arbitrary  information  about  the
       device in the DESC file.

       Here  a  list of obsolete keywords which are recognized by
       groff but completely ignored: spare1, spare2, biggestfont.

   Font file format
       A  font  file  has  two  sections.  The first section is a
       sequence of lines each  containing  a  sequence  of  blank
       delimited  words; the first word in the line is a key, and
       subsequent words give a value for that key.

       name F The name of the font is F.

       spacewidth n
              The normal width of a space is n.

       slant n
              The characters of  the  font  have  a  slant  of  n
              degrees. (Positive means forward.)

       ligatures lig1 lig2...lign [0]
              Characters  lig1, lig2,...,lign are ligatures; pos­
              sible ligatures are ff, fi, fl, ffi and  ffl.   For
              backwards  compatibility, the list of ligatures may
              be terminated with a 0.  The list of ligatures  may
              not extend over more than one line.

       special
              The font is special; this means that when a charac­
              ter is requested that is not present in the current
              font,  it will be searched for in any special fonts
              that are mounted.

       Other commands are ignored by troff but  may  be  used  by
       postprocessors  to  store  arbitrary information about the
       prises a number of fields separated by blanks or tabs. The
       format is

              name metrics type code [entity_name] [-- comment]

       name identifies the character: if name is a single charac­
       ter c then it corresponds to the groff input character  c;
       if  it  is  of  the form \c where c is a single character,
       then it corresponds to the groff input character \c;  oth­
       erwise it corresponds to the groff input character \[name]
       (if it is exactly two characters xx it can be  entered  as
       \(xx).   Groff supports eight bit characters; however some
       utilities has difficulties with eight bit characters.  For
       this  reason, there is a convention that the name charn is
       equivalent to the single character whose code is n .   For
       example, char163 would be equivalent to the character with
       code 163 which is the pounds sterling sign in ISO Latin-1.
       The  name  --- is special and indicates that the character
       is unnamed; such characters can only be used by  means  of
       the \N escape sequence in troff.

       The type field gives the character type:

       1      means  the character has an descender, for example,
              p;

       2      means the character has an ascender,  for  example,
              b;

       3      means  the  character  has  both  an ascender and a
              descender, for example, (.

       The code field gives the code which the postprocessor uses
       to  print  the character.  The character can also be input
       to groff using  this  code  by  means  of  the  \N  escape
       sequence.  The code can be any integer.  If it starts with
       a 0 it will be interpreted as octal; if it starts with  0x
       or 0X it will be intepreted as hexadecimal.

       The  entity_name  field  gives an ascii string identifying
       the glyph which the postprocessor uses to print the  char­
       acter.   This field is optional and has been introduced so
       that the html device driver can encode its character  set.
       For  example,  the  character  `\[Po]'  is  represented as
       `£' in html 4.0.

       Anything on the line after the encoding field resp.  after
       `--' will be ignored.

       The metrics field has the form:

              width[,height[,depth[,italic_correc­

       below the baseline to which the character  extends  (down­
       wards  is  positive); if a character does not extend below
       above the baseline, it  should  be  given  a  zero  depth,
       rather  than a negative depth.  The italic_correction sub­
       field gives the amount of space that should be added after
       the  character  when it is immediately to be followed by a
       character from a roman font.   The  left_italic_correction
       subfield  gives  the  amount of space that should be added
       before the character when it is immediately to be preceded
       by  a  character from a roman font.  The subscript_correc­
       tion gives the amount of space that should be added  after
       a  character  before  adding  a subscript.  This should be
       less than the italic correction.

       A line in the charset section can also have the format

              name "

       This indicates that name is  just  another  name  for  the
       character mentioned in the preceding line.

       The  word  kernpairs  starts  the kernpairs section.  This
       contains a sequence of lines of the form:

              c1 c2 n

       This means that when character c1 appears next to  charac­
       ter  c2  the  space between them should be increased by n.
       Most entries in kernpairs section  will  have  a  negative
       value for n.


FILES

       /usr/share/groff/1.17.2/font/devname/DESC
              Device description file for device name.

       /usr/share/groff/1.17.2/font/devname/F
              Font file for font F of device name.


SEE ALSO

       groff_out(5), troff(1).

Groff Version 1.17.2       27 June 2001             GROFF_FONT(5)
  
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