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Linux Tutorial Topics: 

Note that any given object can relate to more than one topic, so it is likely that pages will appear more than once. For example, concepts may relate to topics that are slightly different from the topic of the page where they are discussed in detail.

Hardware and Devices Nodes

Pages

The Computer Itself -> The Computer Itself
Basic Administration -> Printers and Interfaces -> Printers and Interfaces
Basic Administration -> Printers and Interfaces -> advanced formatting
Basic Administration -> Printers and Interfaces -> printcap
Basic Administration -> Printers and Interfaces -> remote printing
The Operating System -> Hardware Basics -> Hardware Basics
The Operating System -> Devices and Device Nodes -> Devices and Device Nodes
The Operating System -> Rebuilding Your Kernel -> Installing Your Kernel
The Operating System -> Devices and Device Nodes -> Device Drivers -> Device Drivers
The Operating System -> Rebuilding Your Kernel -> Rebuilding Your Kernel
The Computer Itself -> Basic Input-Output Services and the System Bus -> Basic Input-Output Services and the System Bus
The Computer Itself -> The Expansion Bus -> The Expansion Bus
The Computer Itself -> The Expansion Bus -> Industry Standard Architecture ISA
The Computer Itself -> The Expansion Bus -> MCA
The Computer Itself -> The Expansion Bus -> Extended Industry Standard Architecture EISA
The Computer Itself -> The Expansion Bus -> The Small Computer Systems Interface SCSI
The Computer Itself -> The Expansion Bus -> Termination
The Computer Itself -> The Expansion Bus -> PCI
The Computer Itself -> The Expansion Bus -> AGP
The Computer Itself -> Memory -> Memory
The Computer Itself -> Memory -> RAM
The Computer Itself -> Memory -> Cache Memory
The Computer Itself -> The Central Processing Unit -> The Central Processing Unit
The Computer Itself -> The Central Processing Unit -> Intel Processors
The Computer Itself -> The Central Processing Unit -> AMD
The Computer Itself -> The Central Processing Unit -> Alpha Processors
The Computer Itself -> The Central Processing Unit -> Mips
The Computer Itself -> The Central Processing Unit -> SPARC
The Computer Itself -> The Central Processing Unit -> ARM Processors
The Computer Itself -> Hard Disks -> Hard Disks
The Computer Itself -> Hard Disks -> RAID
The Computer Itself -> Hard Disks -> Serial ATA
The Computer Itself -> Tape Drives -> Tape Drives
The Computer Itself -> CD-ROMS -> CD-ROMS
The Computer Itself -> Serial Ports -> Serial Ports
The Computer Itself -> Parallel Ports -> Parallel Ports
The Computer Itself -> Video Cards and Monitors -> Video Cards and Monitors
The Computer Itself -> Printers -> Printers
The Computer Itself -> Mice -> Mice
The Computer Itself -> Uninterruptable Power Supplies -> Uninterruptable Power Supplies
The Computer Itself -> Cases -> Cases
The Computer Itself -> The Right Hardware -> The Right Hardware
The Computer Itself -> HW Diagnostics -> HW Diagnostics
Networking -> Network Technologies -> Network Hardware
Installing and Upgrading -> Adding Hardware -> Adding Hardware
Installing and Upgrading -> Adding Hardware -> Preparation
Installing and Upgrading -> Adding Hardware -> CPU
Installing and Upgrading -> Adding Hardware -> RAM
Installing and Upgrading -> Adding Hardware -> SCSI Devices
Installing and Upgrading -> Adding Hardware -> Hard Disks
Installing and Upgrading -> Adding Hardware -> Other SCSI Devices
Installing and Upgrading -> Adding Hardware -> EIDE Drives
Installing and Upgrading -> Adding Hardware -> CD-ROMs
The Operating System -> Hardware Basics -> CPU Basics
The Operating System -> Hardware Basics -> Memory Basics
The Operating System -> Hardware Basics -> Bus Basics
The Computer Itself -> Motherboards -> Motherboards
The Operating System -> Hardware Basics -> Peripheral and Controller Basics
The Operating System -> Hardware Basics -> Address Spaces
The Operating System -> Hardware Basics -> Timers
The Operating System -> Devices and Device Nodes -> Device Drivers -> Polling and Interrupts
The Operating System -> Devices and Device Nodes -> Device Drivers -> Direct Memory Access
The Operating System -> Devices and Device Nodes -> Device Drivers -> PCI Devices
The Operating System -> Rebuilding Your Kernel -> Modules -> Unloading a Module
The Computer Itself -> Modems -> Modems
The Operating System -> Devices and Device Nodes -> Major and Minor Numbers
The Operating System -> Devices and Device Nodes -> Device Drivers -> Interrupts and Interrupt Handling
Installing and Upgrading -> Preparing for the Installation -> Hardware Requirements
The Computer Itself -> Floppy Drives -> Floppy Drives

Concepts

Linux can be started from any partition.
Linux can combine multiple drives into a single RAID system, even if the drives are of different types.
Two device nodes with completely different names could have the same major and minor numbers and are therefore the exact same device.
A print output that "stair steps" is usually caused by not sending carriage returns.
Linux runs on all common CPU types.
"Rebuilding" a kernel consists of compiling C-lanuage source code files.
After a kernel is rebuilt it is usually "activated" with the 'lilo' command.
Lilo can boot operating systems on different drives as well as different partitions.
Under Linux hardware is accessed through special files called "device nodes".
All the software functions for a specific device are jointly referred to as a
A device node's "major number" tells you what type of device it is.
The collection of connections through which data is transfered is called a "bus".
Device drivers take over the work the BIOS did with DOS and older versions of Windows.
SCSI adpaters allow you to add more devices that you have slots for.
The SCSI-Bus must be closed to work correctly (terminated on both ends).
The SCSI host adapter is not always at the end of the SCSI bus.
SCSI disk use the process of "scatter-gather" to collect and sort a number of data requests before they are sent to the hard disk.
AGP was developed to overcome the data bottleneck with video cards.
A device which works with one Linux distribution, may not necessary work with others. (Although it usually does)
An "unsupported" device typically only means that your particular distribution does not include a driver.
Unlike DOS, Linux can created multiple primary partitions.
An advantage of ISDN is that it used normal telephone lines.
ISDN transmits voices and data.
A switch analyzes packet to determine the destination and makes a virtual connection between the two ports, thus reducing the number of collisions.
A server with a 100-Mbit card connected to workstations with 10-Mbit cards can only transmit at 10-Mbit.
Some network cards (like those from 3Com) can simultaneously transmit data between the card and memory and between the card and other machines.
Twisted pair is "safer" in that if one node goes down the others keep working.
Because a device driver needs to be sure that it has properly completed its task, it usually cannot quit until it has finished.

Glossary

account     active partition     address     administrator     application     ASCII     attribute     bdflush     binary     boot     bridge     buffer     cache memory     CD-ROM     child process     client     clock tick     command line     context switch     CPU     current working directory     cylinder     daemon     descriptor     device driver     device nodes     dirty     DOS     EIDE     environment     error message     event     fault     filesystem     fork     ftp     GDT     GID     GUI     header     host     HOWTO     I/O     IDE     IDT     init     inode     interrupt     kernel     kerneld     login     major number     man-page     MBR     metacharacter     minor number     modem     mount     mouse     multi-tasking     multi-user     network     NFS     nice value     operating system     page fault     panic     parent directory     parent process     partition     permissions     physical memory     PID     pipe     PPID     process     process table     protocol     RAM     region     relink     RPM     SCSI     security     segment     shell     shell script     signal     SMB     software interrupts     stack     standard error     standard input     standard output     stdin     stdout     subdirectory     superblock     swap     swap device     symbolic link     system call     system mode     terminal     text     thrashing     time slice     trap     TSS     UID     UNIX     user mode     variable     VGA     virtual memory     wait channel     WCHAN     Windows 95     X    

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