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Linux Tutorial :: View topic - VMware changing host's /etc/resolv.conf
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VMware changing host's /etc/resolv.conf

 
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koen
Beginner


Joined: Sep 12, 2005
Posts: 224
Location: Belgium

PostPosted: Mon Dec 25, 2006 5:10 pm    Post subject: VMware changing host's /etc/resolv.conf Reply with quote

my PC runs Ubuntu 6.06, and I have VMware Server running on it.
VMware Server has been installed for a couple of months now.

yesterday, I noticed a lost internet connectivity, and a bit of searching narrowed it down to a DNS problem. When I looked at /etc/resolv.conf, the statements that were supposed to be there were replaced by
[code:1]
search localdomain
nameserver 192.168.96.2
[/code:1]
I fixed, only to find that a few minutes later, it had changed again to a name server 172.16.81.2
Fixed it again and set the permissions for resolv.conf to r--r--r-- ;
only to find that a few minutes later, it had changed again - and so on ad infinitum

by then, I realised these networks were actually VMware's virtual networks.
I ran ifconfig and brought down the vmnet interfaces.
That solved the problem for a while, but the vmnet interfaces seem to come up again, and resolv.conf still gets modified.

so I'm wondering :
- did I do something wrong while seetting up VMware Server && how can I fix it ?
- how does a r--r--r-- file get modified ?
- why did this only start happening yesterday while I've had and used VMserver for a couple of months ?

things that I changed yesterday were :
- installed squid on an other machine and told firefox on my PC to use it. I'm mentioning this because the squid pkg suggests "resolvconf" - but i did not install it. There is also no [i]resolvconf[/i] (the package) installed on my ubuntu pc.
- installed and used a WinXP in a VM virtual machine, using bridged networking to the physical NIC of the ubuntu host[/b]
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koen
Beginner


Joined: Sep 12, 2005
Posts: 224
Location: Belgium

PostPosted: Tue Dec 26, 2006 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[code:1]kn# cat /etc/resolv.conf
search whitespace.xx
nameserver 192.168.1.1
[/code:1]
I'm on a local network, and i'm running a dns server (192.168.1.1) on a Debian machine, so not on the ubuntu PC. It has a zone file for the LAN and forwards things it doesn't know about (like the internet) to my ISP's DNS servers.
'whitespace.xx' is what I use for local dns domain name
I don't use /etc/hosts, it only has a reference to 127.0.0.1 in it.

I don't know what they mean with 'well configured", but my /etc/resolv looks fine to me (don't understand why anyone would want to change it Smile ) and has been doing a great job so far.

I also don't understand the "you may re-routed on web". Any idea what it means ?
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koen
Beginner


Joined: Sep 12, 2005
Posts: 224
Location: Belgium

PostPosted: Wed Dec 27, 2006 10:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think I found how this works.
The DNS config is supplied by my DHCP server (also on 192.168.1.1).
However, VMserver is providing its own DNS and DHCP service for the virtual hosts.
So when I run dhclient while VMware Server is running, I get DHCPOFFERS from th VM virutual Network, and they also give out their own DNS servers.

I verified this with running this loop in a terminal, allowing me to monitor resolv.conf with 1 second intervals:
[code:1]while true; do cat /etc/resolv.conf; echo; sleep 1;done[/code:1]
and executing dhclient in an other - I could see resolv.conf change with every DHCP exchange.

So maybe I ran dhclient that day - I don't remember.
I probably never had this problem before because VMware Server runs on my PC, which would get its netwerk config from my server when starting up, before the VMare Server starts.

Still, there are some questions left, such as
is this [i]supposed[/i] to happen ? What if i was running vmware server on an other machine - would it give out network configuration to the "real" network - eg to my PC when it boots ? And how would I avoid that, given that I prefer to have some sort of connectivity between real hosts and virtual machines so I can upload files to them or open sessions (ssh, rdp, ...) on them from my PC ?

just wondering .... and nothing really urgent : I got it working again for now and will worry about the remaining questions some other time Smile
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koen
Beginner


Joined: Sep 12, 2005
Posts: 224
Location: Belgium

PostPosted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote]Depends on how you set up networking when you created your virtual machines. If the network is bridged, then all the VMs should get DHCP/DNS/etc from your server.[/quote]
That's what I usually do.
But when I installed VMWare server, I also let it create virtual networks. Maybe that wasn't such a good idea - I'm gonna have to read the documentation on VMware networking, I'm afraid.
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YaraKessler
Newbie


Joined: Apr 13, 2010
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sun Apr 18, 2010 3:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote]Quote:
Depends on how you set up networking when you created your virtual machines. If the network is bridged, then all the VMs should get DHCP/DNS/etc from your server.

That's what I usually do.
But when I installed VMWare server, I also let it create virtual networks. Maybe that wasn't such a good idea - I'm gonna have to read the documentation on VMware networking, I'm afraid.[/quote]

Looking for a good tutorial on VMware---something very detailed for the inexperienced. Thanks.


Last edited by YaraKessler on Thu May 21, 2015 8:39 pm; edited 2 times in total
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two0426
Newbie


Joined: Apr 29, 2010
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Thu Apr 29, 2010 3:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SPAM REMOVED
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